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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
morning. thanks for taking my call. my comment is about the fiscal cliff and social security, i don't really think that social security has really ever been a cause of the deficit. there's more funds coming in than there is funds being sent out in checks. and this whole security tax is a separate tax from the federal tax. and -- host: so this proposal includes the extension of the payroll tax cut. what do you think of that proposal? >> i think that's fine. i think extending the payroll tax is probably something we're going to have to look at doing. but when they start talking about using social security money, that botters me, because social security is never needed -- has never needed federal dollars before to fund the program. host: ok. off of twitter this is reding who says they have not offered a deficit reduction plan. republican big pledges tax reform and closing unspecified tax loopholes. arthur, good morning. go ahead. what do you think about the proposedal? caller: i think the proposal is kind of ludacris. but i really think that the republicans should back away. they shou
weeks because he does not think the proposal to avoid a fiscal cliff is serious one. negotiations here are nowhere. another republican, senator lindsey graham thinks he thinks things are heading down hill. >> i think we are going over the cliff. it's clear to me they made a political calculation. the offer doesn't deal with the entitlement reform to save the medicare and medicaid and social security from imminent bankruptcy. it raises $1.6 trillion on job creators to destroy the economy. no spending controls. >> reporter: treasuresy secretary tim geithner advocated for clinton era tax rates and wants top earns to pay 39.6%. he said when that was the rate in the '90s there was was good economic growth and strong private investment. said republicans would rather raise revenue closing the loophole and limiting deduction need the time to realize that might not bring in enough cash. >> that is a good set of propose is and good for the economy. if they have suggestions, they want to go further, lay it out to us. >> secretary geithner said he cannot promise we won't go off the fiscal cliff. s
and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls church sitting down with the santana family. their parents who also are employed live in the household with them. so if taxes do go up on middle class americans, the overall hit on that household will be $4,000. so they're very concerned, but they were quite happy. they said it isn't every day that the president comes by and hangs out at your house. the message the president was trying to drive home today was aimed directly at congress and using this backdrop to tell a personal story. >> for them to be burdene
, education and housing assistance. as referred to as the fiscal cliff. and when it comes to doing something to avoid it, house speaker john boehner bluntly told reporters today, there is a stalemate. for his part, president obama is trying to break that stalemate by asking voters to put more pressure on the republicans. cnn chief white house correspondent jessica yellin and chief political correspondent gloria borger join us right now. gloria, guess i'll start with you. does the president have any leverage? >> he has a lot of leverage right now. i mean, if you look back to the debt ceiling in the summer of 2011, you recall the president was accused of negotiating with himself because it was sort of a time of weakness for him. right now, look, joe, he's just won re-election. 67% of the american public according to our polls believes that there should be a deal that contains a combination of spending cuts and tax increases. more than half of the american public says, you know what, we'd like the taxes on the wealthy to go up. so he does have public opinion on his side. just been re-elected. s
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
our economy. how to deal with them in a responsible way, get us passed this fiscal cliff, passed in august, only plan in washington, d.c., to prevent these debilitating tax increases from hitting across all of our family owned small businesses. finally, mr. speaker, h.r. 6365, it's the national security and job protection act. we passed that in september. that's the bill that looks specifically at these coming defense cuts. these cuts that secretary of defense leon panetta has called devastating in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester r
to garner public support and back republicans into a corner as fiscal cliff negotiations continue. tim geithner went up to the hill yesterday and laid out the president's offer. this is what it looks like. the goal is to get to $1.6 trillion in revenue. letting the tax cuts expire for the top 2% and then raise capital gains. that would bring in $196 billion. and then the tax code over overhaul, and extension of unemployment benefits and more stimulus spending. republicans for their part dismiss the offer immediately calling it unbalanced, and unreasonable. so the question is what kind of leverage do republicans have at this point? talking points memo notes that they do have control over whether or not we raise the debt ceiling which is something we have to do in the next few weeks or so. while it does not factor into the mass that is considered right now it does give house speaker john boehner program cuts like entitlement cuts back into the conversation. we're back with the show stay with us. as i looked out across the battlefield at antietam. i saw the future of one great nation. but
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)